Flying Pets in Cargo on British Airways

If your pet is not a trained service animal, he will need to travel as cargo. On British Airways, the animal, weather, and timing largely determine cargo availability. Many pet owners fly their animals as cargo when they do not plan to travel with the pet. With some airlines, you may be able to arrange for same-flight cargo transport. This is not the case with British Airways, whose cargo is handled by IAG World Cargo—a sister company.  

To ensure you may successfully fly a pet in cargo with British Airways, here is the information you need.  

  

How much does it cost to fly a pet with British Airways?
The cost will depend on your pet’s size and travel zone. Prices can range from $196 to over $1,000 per pet. For more information, see the cargo website 

  

Who handles British Airways Cargo?
AIG World Cargo—a sister company of British Airways. 

  

How many animals/pets are allowed on each flight?
Availability is variable.  

  

Which animals can fly British Airways Cargo?
Dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, hamsters, monkeys, ferrets, snakes, and tropical fish.  

  

What are the crate requirements?
Crate size depends on the animal’s dimensions. IAG Cargo provides a helpful crate calculator.   

  

What pet travel forms are required?
All animals require a health certificate issues by a licensed veterinarian at least ten days prior to travel. All forms should be attached to the crate. 

  

How to Book a Pet Cargo Reservation with British Airways 

IAG Cargo is a different department. To make a reservation, see their website. If flying an animal as cargo, you must check in at an IAG Cargo facility, not the reservations desk, at least four hours prior to international flights and at least two hours prior to domestic flights. Pet parents will be asked to sign a Form of Indemnity to cover British Airways against any costs arising from your pet needing to enter quarantine. 

 

Other Types of Pet and Animal Travel with British Airways 

 

More FAQ Information About Pets in Cargo 

  

Is there a difference between flying an animal as checked baggage and flying him a cargo?
Yes. An animal flying as checked baggage is on the same flight as you. In this case, you will drop him off at the check-in counter and pick him up in excess baggage claim upon arrival. An animal flying as cargo flies separately and must be processed at a cargo facility. British Airways only offers cargo transportation for non-service animals. 

 

What are the carrier requirements and options for British Airways pet policy?
The minimum requirements for cats is a series 200 kennel (27”L x 20”W x 19”H). The container must be strong enough to protect the pet during transport, contain it, and provide sufficient ventilation on all four sides. The door must be secured in such a manner that it will not open accidentally, and your pet’s nose and paws should not be able to fit through any ventilation opening or door mesh. Fiberboard, wire mesh, and wicker containers are not suitable for air transport.  

You must only use a container if the animal is traveling as cargo. Therefore, the crate must have a water pot and a food container accessible from the outside. For more information about the IATA Live Animal Regulations, see their website 

 

Does British Airways provide any statements regarding brachycephalic animals?
British Airways does not mention any limitations on transporting brachycephalic animals. However, IAG World Cargo requires that short and snub-nosed animals travel in a container that is 10% larger than the minimum. The airline considers the following breeds to be snub-nosed: Boston Terrier, Boxer, Brussels Griffin, Chow Chow, English Toy Spaniel, Japanese Chin, and Pekinese. Bulldogs and pugs are not permitted. 

 

Does British Airways mention any environmental concerns?
As with most airlines, British Airways understands the additional risk associated with live animals traveling in extreme temperatures. Your pet may not be allowed to board if the temperature in any city on the itinerary is forecasted to be above 85 or below 45 degrees Fahrenheit. This applies only to animals traveling as cargo.