2 10, 2018

How to Manage Other Passengers with Pet Allergies

By |2019-11-20T14:16:20-07:00October 2nd, 2018|Blog|0 Comments

Some of the worst stories we hear about pet travel have to do with running into people who have severe pet allergies. The majority of the time, the affected person will leave their seat and find a flight attendant. Worse yet are people who willingly take their frustration out on you, rather than the airline who sold the ticket to you and your pet. In the heat of the moment, your immediate reaction should be to stay calm and to alert a member of the flight crew as soon as possible. Here  is what else you might consider to avoid and deal with passengers with pet allergies.

 

What to Expect from the Airline

In the case of service animals and emotional support animals, the airline may be legally required to accommodate the animal as a necessary part of the passenger’s travel support. Regardless, even regular pet owners will find that if the airline accepted their pet reservation, they will find a way to accommodate the pet. That’s assuming all the relevant rules and guidelines for airline pet travel are followed.

In almost every case, pets are accommodated by reseating passengers with allergies in a different part of the plane. If the airline and flight crew are really on their game, they’ll identify any passenger traveling with a pet on that flight and they’ll double check with other passengers in nearby rows to identify potential problems before they occur. Even so, there’s no way to completely eliminate the risk of a passenger having an allergic reaction, if only because it’s possible that people (and children especially) discover their pet allergy during the flight.

 

What the Science Says about Pet Allergies

According to the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, about 10 percent of the American population is allergic to pets. Contrary to popular opinion, pet fur is not especially allergic. Rather, it’s the saliva, urine, and especially dried flakes of skin (dander) that cause an allergic reaction. Dander can stay allergic for weeks after it’s been shed. So waving a favorite cat toy in the air may be more problematic than the animal itself.

Cat allergies are about twice as common as dog allergies. Nevertheless, problems with dog allergies are more common because dog owners are about 3.5 times more likely than cat owners to travel with their pet. Of course, this statistic doesn’t matter to cat owners who buck the idea that it’s only dog owners who love to travel. These people will still find most airlines accommodate their cat, but we do recommend that cat owners be a little more proactive in these situations. Help flag down the flight attendant and be willing to offer to change seats.

 

Bonus Tips: Carrier Covers

If you want to be extra cautious and considerate, brush and groom your pet before travel. If you’re like us, you’ll give the pet a quick brushing but will be too busy to really do a thorough job. You might also drape a cover over the carrier. This will help keep dander and saliva in the carrier as much as possible, while also helping the pet stay calm from noises and distractions that may set them on edge. This advice applies to dogs, but it goes double for cats. Not only are more people allergic, but cats are more likely to get anxious by being overstimulated.

Again, keep favorite toys and other pet items in the carrier. You might also think about bringing along an antihistamine to offer nearby passengers who have only mild pet allergies. But really, the best bet is to rely on the airline to reseat affected passengers.

 

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25 09, 2018

Dogs in Cars: Going on a Long Road Trip with a Beloved Pet

By |2018-09-25T15:20:17-06:00September 25th, 2018|Blog|0 Comments

While air travel is our bread-and-butter, Dogs on Planes loves talking about pretty much anything related to pet travel. One big thing that sticks out to us: While people tend to overestimate the hassles and risks that come with flying with a dog, we find that they tend to underestimate these same hassles and risks when going on a long road trip. We wanted to take a moment and address potential problems dog owners face. We’ll also provide tips to plan for going on a road trip with a dog in the best and worst-case scenarios.

 

The Golden Rule for Going on a Road Trip with a Dog

As with most any type of pet travel, the golden rule is to know the habits and temperament of your dog. Is he or she typically a chill animal? Does he or she normally do well with traveling? When it comes to air travel, it gets a little pricey to go a trial run. The exact opposite is true with car rides. Even for dogs that are used to car rides, if anything, step up the number of places for which you bring along your dog. No reason to go crazy or try to take them someplace they don’t belong, but don’t assume that the best plan is to take a break from car rides because the dog will get their full on the road trip.

 

Tips for Making Iffy Dogs Car-Happy Travelers

Even if you know this golden rule, there’s not always a clear-cut yes or no answer. Many dogs are reasonably well-behaved in most situations, even though getting in the car isn’t their favorite thing. One of the most common reasons that dogs aren’t thrilled by car rides is that they associate the car with going to the vet. This is something that’s easy to change especially for dogs that aren’t too old and set in their ways. Take them to the dog park. Take them to the pet store with you for their next toy or treat. Take them to see friends, family members or neighbors. Take them on doggy playdates if they like other dogs. Take them to the lake if they like to swim. Give them plenty of affection and create a positive experience.

 

General Tips for Road-Tripping with Your Dog

  • Make sure the vehicle is in good working order. And not just the engine, but the air conditioning and heater as well. Especially if you expect to need it.
  • Take lots of potty breaks. Every 4-6 hours is ideal. More than 8-12 hours and the pet’s urological health is bound to suffer. Apart from the animal’s comfort level, you definitely don’t want to deal with a urinary tract infection while traveling.
  • Bathroom breaks aren’t the only reason to make frequent stops. Just like humans, there are few things better for relaxation than plenty of exercise. Less commonly, an anxious or low-energy dog may curl up in one spot for long periods of time. Encourage the dog to run around to calm down and to prevent the rare blood clot.
  • Small, frequent snacks are usually the best bet for feeding on a road trip. The dog shouldn’t go hungry, but a full belly in a cramped space is going to make it that much harder for the dog to get comfortable. It can also lead to doggy vomit.
  • Get a micro-chip. Even if your dog always responds to voice commands. Even if your dog sticks by your side all the time. There’s simply too much potential for a dog to get spooked in an unfamiliar setting and less chance they will be able to find their way back to you if separated.
  • Windows can be tricky. Roll them down, and the dog gets to see and smell the outside world. It’s a little different when you’re at highway speeds and the slightest piece of debris can cause serious harm. We roll our windows down when we’re not on the highway and try to leave them barely cracked when we are on the highway.

 

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17 09, 2018

The Future of Pet Travel 

By |2019-11-20T14:18:30-07:00September 17th, 2018|Blog|0 Comments

Pets and their parents are traveling with increasing frequency. While studies indicate pet parents travel less frequently than their non-pet-owning counterparts, more of them are becoming comfortable with long-distance travel. Surprisingly, the pet travel industry has not progressed in the wake of this skyrocketing popularity. Airlines have adjusted their pet policies to reflect new and persisting dangers, but comparatively little has been done to prepare for the future of pet travel.

Though we have yet to see a lot of significant changes to pet travel, we predict they are just beyond the horizon. The tide is beginning to turn for curated pet travel experiences, and we can only expect technology, manufacturing, and amenities to progress at a similar pace. We peeked into our pet travel crystal ball (i.e. spent some time researching) and predict the following trends and changes for the future of pet travel.  

 

Hotels and Airlines Introduce More Pet Amenities 

Whether they need to cater to existing guests or attract a new demographic, hotels and airlines are doing what they can to sweeten the pet travel pot. Airlines are beginning to reevaluate their existing pet policies to make travel safer, more accessible, and less stressful. United Airlines recently conducted an internal audit of their pet policy and imposed several new safety measures. Air India recently allowed a dog to travel in business class—something most airlines prohibit, as an animal’s presence may disrupt high-paying flyers. The tide is beginning to turn, and we’re excited to see how airlines adapt to the increasing number of pet passengers. 

Similarly, hotels have begun to capitalize on the importance of pet-friendly policies and amenities. Walt Disney World, which recently implemented a dog-friendly hotel pilot program, has extended the scheme. La Quinta, a popular hotel brand, has extended its pet-friendly amenities to more than 700 locations in the United States. Several resorts have introduced “yappy hour” to their weekly programming, and pet-friendly restaurants are appearing across the country. In the next decade, we expect to see most national hotel chains offering a variety of pet amenities.  

 

The Future of Pet Travel is about Safety

While pet travel safety has always been a priority for airlines and passengers, pet parents are beginning to understand the importance of properly securing pups in vehicles. While pet travel is becoming more frequent, many parents are seeking alternatives to flying. In some cases, this might mean a long-distance road trip. Even if you do not plan to take your pup on a 50mi+ ride, everyday trips to the park and vet can pose a risk to the animal’s health. As this issue gets more coverage, we expect to see a greater push toward pet car safety with more brands rolling out multi-use seatbelts and safety harnesses 

 

Online Retailers Get Cheaper 

While we argue that there are still benefits to shopping at brick-and-mortar stores for pet products, e-Commerce is beginning to turn up the heat. According to a Packaged Facts 2018 survey of U.S. pet owners, 37% of online pet shoppers indicated “I am buying pet products online more than I used to.” Online retailers stock a huge selection of products online. Without the burden of physical stores, they can pass the savings to their customers. However, some brick-and-mortar stores are keeping pace with online-only retailers. PetSmart recently introduced a line of online-only deals to draw more customers. With this added pressure, we expect online businesses to continue dropping prices and seeking cheaper manufacturing options.  

 

Smart Devices Aid Concerned Pet Parents 

Pet travel is a nerve-wracking experience. Unless your pet qualifies for in-cabin transport, your furry friend will need to fly in the aircraft’s cargo hold. The inability to check on the animal during a flight is a great stressor for many pet parents. Similarly, pet shipping is a notoriously stressful experience. Most people are overwhelmed when packages are lost, and the thought of losing a pet in transit is an enormous anxiety. Some airlines are already working to address this. Delta, for example, introduced a GPS On-Demand tracking program, which allows pet parents to monitor their animals throughout the journey in real-time. Virgin America prioritizes same-flight cargo shipments, and Alaska Airlines has a Fur-st Class program, which properly educates team members on the basics of animal care. As more animals take to the skies, we expect airlines to keep pace for stressed pet parents. 

While our predictions may take years to come to fruition, retailers, hotels, and airlines are already beginning to take notice of increased demand for pet-friendly amenities. Pet travel is only going to become easier, more affordable, and more convenient—we just have to be patient. In the meantime, researching your airlines and airports ahead of your trip is a great way to ameliorate the burden of pet travel.

 

The Future of Pet Travel 

Pets and their parents are traveling with increasing frequency. While studies indicate pet parents travel less frequently than their non-pet-owning counterparts, more of them are becoming comfortable with long-distance travel. Surprisingly, the pet travel industry has not progressed in the wake of this skyrocketing popularity. Airlines have adjusted their pet policies to reflect new and persisting dangers, but little has been done to expand the industry. 

Though we have yet to see a lot of significant changes to pet travel, we predict they are just beyond the horizon. The tide is beginning to turn for curated pet travel experiences, and we can only expect technology, manufacturing, and amenities to progress at a similar pace. We peeked into our pet travel crystal ball (i.e. spent some time researching) and predict the following trends and changes in the coming years.  

 

Hotels and Airlines Introduce More Pet Amenities 

Whether they need to cater to existing guests or attract a new demographic, hotels and airlines are doing what they can to sweeten the pet travel pot. Airlines are beginning to reevaluate their existing pet policies to make travel safer, more accessible, and less stressful. United Airlines recently conducted an internal audit of their pet policy and imposed several new safety measures. Air India recently allowed a dog to travel in business class—something most airlines prohibit, as an animal’s presence may disrupt high-paying flyers. The tide is beginning to turn, and we’re excited to see how airlines adapt to the increasing number of pet passengers. 

Similarly, hotels have begun to capitalize on the importance of pet-friendly policies and amenities. Walt Disney World, which recently implemented a dog-friendly hotel pilot program, has extended the scheme. La Quinta, a popular hotel brand, has extended its pet-friendly amenities to more than 700 locations in the United States. Several resorts have introduced “yappy hour” to their weekly programming, and pet-friendly restaurants are appearing across the country. In the next decade, we expect to see most national hotel chains offering a variety of pet amenities.  

 

Pet Travel Safety Becomes a Priority 

While pet travel safety has always been a priority for airlines and passengers, pet parents are beginning to understand the importance of properly securing pups in vehicles. While pet travel is becoming more frequent, many parents are seeking alternatives to flying. In some cases, this might mean a long-distance road trip. Even if you do not plan to take your pup on a 50mi+ ride, everyday trips to the park and vet can pose a risk to the animal’s health. As this issue gets more coverage, we expect to see a greater push toward pet car safety with more brands rolling out multi-use seatbelts and safety harnesses 

 

Online Retailers Get Cheaper 

While we argue that there are still benefits to shopping at brick-and-mortar stores for pet products, e-Commerce is beginning to turn up the heat. According to a Packaged Facts 2018 survey of U.S. pet owners, 37% of online pet shoppers indicated “I am buying pet products online more than I used to.” Online retailers stock a huge selection of products online. Without the burden of physical stores, they can pass the savings to their customers. However, some brick-and-mortar stores are keeping pace with online-only retailers. PetSmart recently introduced a line of online-only deals to draw more customers. With this added pressure, we expect online businesses to continue dropping prices and seeking cheaper manufacturing options.  

 

Smart Devices Aid Concerned Pet Parents 

Pet travel is a nerve-wracking experience. Unless your pet qualifies for in-cabin transport, your furry friend will need to fly in the aircraft’s cargo hold. The inability to check on the animal during a flight is a great stressor for many pet parents. Similarly, pet shipping is a notoriously stressful experience. Most people are overwhelmed when packages are lost, and the thought of losing a pet in transit is an enormous anxiety. Some airlines are already working to address this. Delta, for example, introduced a GPS On-Demand tracking program, which allows pet parents to monitor their animals throughout the journey in real-time. Virgin America prioritizes same-flight cargo shipments, and Alaska Airlines has a Fur-st Class program, which properly educates team members on the basics of animal care. As more animals take to the skies, we expect airlines to keep pace for stressed pet parents. 

While our predictions may take years to come to fruition, retailers, hotels, and airlines are already beginning to take notice of increased demand for pet-friendly amenities. Pet travel is only going to become easier, more affordable, and more convenient—we just have to be patient. In the meantime, researching your airlines and airports ahead of your trip is a great way to ameliorate the burden of pet travel.  

 

 

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10 09, 2018

Airline-Approved Carriers of the Future 

By |2019-11-20T14:18:54-07:00September 10th, 2018|Blog|0 Comments

Pet travel is a practice that’s been growing in popularity for many years and shows no signs of slowing down. Around 60% of dog owners transport their pet by car at least once each month. While long-distance pet travel is less frequent, it’s still more popular than ever before. Thirty percent of pet owners reported transporting their pets long distances, up from 14% in 2013. Pet adoption numbers are up, which means pet travel is more popular than ever. The formerly niche industry is having to keep up with growing demand and the result has been specialized airline pet policies, added travel options, and lower travel rates. 

While many facets of pet travel are progressing, one has stayed firmly stagnant: technology. Airline-approved pet carriers have remained relatively unchanged for the past decade. To an extent, we understand this; if it’s not broken, don’t fix it. Pet carriers continue to keep animals safe and secure during their time in transit. There are, however, many aspects of pet carriers that hinder pet parents’ ability to travel. The most prohibitive? Weight. 

 

Weight Limits for Airline Pet Travel

Most commercial airlines impose size and weight restrictions on traveling pets. The sweet spot sits between 15lb and 20lb. Animals in carriers that weigh more than the maximum limit are not permitted to travel. Unfortunately, pet carriers cut significantly into that weight requirement, often weighing between 3lbs and 7lbs. This disqualifies some of America’s most popular dog breeds from most commercial flights. For example, a standard Dachshund will weigh between 16lbs and 19lbs. Unless the owner scours the internet in search of an ultralightweight carrier, this small companion breed will have trouble flying. Only toy breeds, such as Chihuahuas, Lhasa Apso, and Miniature Poodles, can consistently fit within the in-cabin guidelines. Even larger cats are hindered by the weight limit.  

So, if the maximum weight is so low, why aren’t pet carrier manufacturers scrambling to lower the overall weight of their products? The most lightweight carriers on the market weigh around 3lbs and are made of soft material, such as polyester and fleece—not the most durable materials. Brands like ibiyaya are working to decrease the overall weight of pet carriers (their lightest weighs just 1.37lbs), but high costs make these products inaccessible to most pet parents.  

 

The Next Generation of Pet Carriers

Here’s the most frustrating part of this discrepancy: the perfect lightweight material exists. Dyneema, an ultralightweight fabric, has a strength-to-weight ratio around ten times stronger than steel. Plus, you can already purchase this material in a range of products—just not airline-approved pet carriers. Current lightweight technology is employed in a variety of travel scenarios, from backpacking to back country exploration. Plus, it’s not expensive to make; Dyneema and other ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene substances is relatively cheap to manufacture 

That said, here’s where we see the future of airline-approved pet carriers: As the demand for lightweight carriers grows, manufacturers will begin to utilize existing lightweight technology. Pet travel is growing each year, and parents with larger breeds (or overweight pets) will continue searching for solutions. Relatively inexpensive production costs will drive prices down once enough brands get on the lightweight bandwagon. This “race to the bottom” will finally make this material accessible to most consumers.  

 

Alternate Solutions for Increasing Pet Travel Options 

There is another potential outcome. Airlines themselves may feel pressured to increase the maximum weight limit. Pet-centric travel planning and pet amenities are quickly increasing in popularity, and we would not be surprised to see airlines try to cash in on the trend. Certain American Airlines flights already have pet-friendly business class pods; we expect to see more of the same in the coming years.  

Regardless of which option becomes reality, here’s the good news: lightweight and airline-approved pet carriers are in our future. We may need to wait for the market to catch up to pet parent trends, but we expect to see ultralightweight pet travel gear become a strong and sustainable trend.  

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20 08, 2018

Creative Ways to Use Your Pet Store when Preparing to Travel

By |2019-11-20T14:28:04-07:00August 20th, 2018|Blog|0 Comments

Pet stores are excellent resources for purchasing required materials for your upcoming flight. However, pet parents should fully utilize pet stores before a trip. Sure, customers can buy crates and kennels, or perhaps stock up on treats and toys. However, pet owners should treat pet stores as general knowledge and specialty service resources—not just as places to buy a new pet carrier. Below, we have detailed four creative ways to make the most of your local pet store.

 

Training and Behavior Resources

Most pet stores will have written training resources in the form of books, pamphlets, and brochures. However, some stores—primarily large chain businesses and specialty stores—provide training and behavioral clinics for free or at a low cost. Ask your sales associate if the store offers any type of training programs for customers. If they don’t, ask if they have any connections to or promotions for nearby training facilities or clinics.

Training and behavior resources cam be especially useful for pet parents looking to travel with their animals; though it is unlikely that a store will have a travel-oriented workshop, most will offer anything from stress-relief clinics to command training. Additionally, specialty stores may in fact have travel-related workshops. If you have a small, independently-owned pet store nearby, ask about possible travel workshops. Small businesses thrive because of their ability to support a hyper-local market. If you point out the need for a resource like this, a business owner may consider hosting a clinic or workshop.

 

Minimal and Last-Minute Vet Visits

Some large pet stores have in-house veterinarians or veterinarian technicians. These professionals take care of any animals living in the store, but they also provide services to customers. In general, this should not be a substitute for a regular veterinarian; these facilities often lack the technology necessary for invasive procedures and testing. However, pet store vet visits are a great way to prepare for your flight. We previously detailed Alaska Airlines’ partnership with Banfield Pet Hospitals, which are located within PetSmart stores. The airline provides free pet health examinations and discounted health certificates to their passengers’ furry friends. Even if you’re not flying with Alaska Airlines, visiting one of these veterinary venues is a great way to quickly and efficiently get your travel paperwork together.

 

Pet Nutrition Advice

This creative pet store use does not deal directly with pet travel and transportation. It is, however, vitally important. Unless your pet has a specific health or dietary need, such as a urinary health or weight loss regime, a veterinarian may not have the market knowledge to recommend moderately-priced and comprehensive pet foods. A pet store, however, is consistently updating its inventory to provide a range of food options to best fit animals’ changing needs. If you’re unsure which pet food to use, a pet store sales associate will be able to provide direction. To that end, if you have a picky pet, bring him into the store; in some cases, suppliers will provide samples, allowing you to choose the food your pet likes most.

 

General Knowledge

Pet stores are excellent resources for anything and everything related to pet health, pet care, and pet recreation. People who choose to work at pet stores—particularly small and independently-owned stores—do so because they have a love for animals. Many pet store associates have pet care experience, and many have prior practice as veterinary assistants or technicians. Whether your pet is behaving strangely or doesn’t seem to like the new toy you purchased, a pet store sales associate should have enough knowledge to steer you in the right direction. Of course, if you believe your pet may be sick or injured, a trip to the veterinarian is non-negotiable. If, however, you have basic questions about behavior, training, food, and recreation, a pet store can help.

In addition to having knowledgeable staff, pet stores will often devote a small section to general knowledge resources. This could be training books and manuals, free behavior brochures, or a place for local animal professionals to advertise various services. Ask the sales clerk if the store has a section like this—you could find the resource you’ve been looking for to get your pet ready for a big trip.

 

 

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16 07, 2018

A Comprehensive Guide to Moving with Your Pet

By |2019-11-20T14:29:58-07:00July 16th, 2018|Blog|0 Comments

In the United States, moving season is the period of time between Memorial Day and Labor Day—in essence, summer. As the season’s zenith approaches, hundreds of thousands of Americans around the country are packing up their lives for new jobs, new apartments, and first-time homeownership. Many of us have moved previously—to college, to a new city, into a first apartment. Many of us, however, haven’t gone through the experience of moving with a pet. The experience is markedly different and learning what’s typically involved is the best way to prepare for the event.

The moving process can be broken into four steps: searching for housing, packing, transportation, and unpacking/introduction. Below, we have included essential guides and tips to having a successful move—whether you’re moving down the street or across the country.

 

Finding Housing

The first step of the moving process is straightforward: you need to find a new place to live. If you’re moving into a new apartment or condominium, you will need to do some extra research to find pet-friendly housing. Some landlords ban animals outright, whereas others have restrictions on the size, breed, and number of pets you can have in the space. When searching for new housing, keep the following actions in mind.

 

  • Be up-front about your pet. When using online apartment search tools, filter for “pet-friendly” to reduce your options. When you meet building owners and real estate agents, ask about pet policies and past experiences with pet owners. Never lie about owning a pet, and don’t try to hide an animal in an apartment. In the best-case scenario, you will need to get rid of the animal. In the worst-case scenario, you may be evicted or subject to other legal action for breaking the terms of your lease.

 

  • Prepare to pay. Depending on your location, you may be asked to pay a pet fee, pet rent, or a higher security deposit. Save or factor this into your monthly budget to avoid unpleasant surprises. If a potential landlord is on the fence about allowing an animal in the building, offer to put down more money in the security deposit to show responsibility and accountability. Additionally, some building owners will require pet-related documentation: vaccination documents, dog licenses, a letter from a veterinarian, and/or a letter from your current property owner. Some of these items will cost money, but it is important to have them prepped and ready to go if you get approved for an apartment.

 

  • Don’t put it off. Begin looking for housing as soon as you decide to move. Though it may be too early to find a home for your move-in date, do what you can to familiarize yourself with the buildings and availability in the area. If you find that most listings in one neighborhood are not pet friendly, continue looking in a different area. Finding a housing as early as possible will allow you to spend more time preparing yourself and your pets for the move.

 

Packing

Regardless of where you’re moving, you must always pack strategically. The process can take several weeks, providing both a physical and emotional burden for everyone in the house. Pets are also impacted by the packing process. It is therefore essential to consider their role in the process.

 

  • Be strategic. Start early—two or three weeks before your moving day, and pack items you use least first. Starting with materials like china and books is a great way to get the process started. As boxes begin to pile up, store them in an inconspicuous area—the back room you never use, or perhaps the dining room table. Do what you can to keep the animals away from the boxes. They may see this new configuration of belongings as a toy; they might attempt to get into boxes, sit atop the pile, or otherwise hurt themselves or the belongings. Additionally, putting your boxes in a discreet spot allows the pets to continue living in the space normally, thus preventing stress build-up.

 

  • Save pet equipment for the end. When you start to pack your animals will understand that something big is happening. Work on staving off stress and bad behavior by packing up their belongings last. Save items like food bowls, litter boxes, and toys for the end. Your pets will be able to use their things, and saving these items can allow for easy access during the moving process.

 

Transportation

Transportation is the most physically exhausting part of the moving experience. Whether you’re moving yourself or hiring professionals, you will need to drive you and your family (human or fur) to the new home. In some cases, this could mean a short trip up the block. In others, it might mean spending several days in a car, or perhaps several hours on an airplane. Smart transportation is key to a safe moving experience, and preparing your pet for travel is the best strategy for a smooth transition.

 

  • Secure everything in advance. If you plan to fly to your new home, book your tickets as early as possible. Most airlines limit the number of pets on each flight, so securing your animal’s spot is essential for a safe move. Airline pet policies vary, so do your research to see what restrictions apply. In some cases, shipping a pet may be the easiest and safest option. Some airlines provide shipping services; use our guide to determine which provider will work best for your move.

 

  • Double-check pet-friendly hotel policies. Those driving to their new homes may spend several days in the car. Carefully plan your overnight stops to include hotels with friendly pet-policies. For added safety, call ahead to verify advertised policies to ensure that you and your furry friends will be able to spend the evening. When staying at a hotel, do your best to keep the animals confined to one part of the room, and place food, water, and litterboxes in the bathroom to avoid possible cleaning fees.

 

  • Consider your options. Sometimes, the best transportation option may be obvious. Other times, you may struggle to figure out which will work for your situation. Remember that cats and dogs respond to travel differently, and there are several pet-friendly transportation providers available—airlines, trains, and car rentals. Consider every possible method before deciding on a strategy.

 

Introduction

You’ve found a place, packed up your belongings, and transported everything to your new home. Now, the fun part begins. You may be tempted to let your pets out immediately, but remain vigilant and wary of hidden dangers. Use the first few minutes after your arrival to get the animals outside of the car. Then, follow these five steps to ensure an easy and safe introduction.

 

  1. Move slowly to avoid overstimulation.
  2. Prioritize safety by locking the animals in a room while you check for potential dangers.
  3. Unload strategically by placing boxes into their appropriate rooms.
  4. Emphasize comfort by putting pet items in familiar locations.
  5. Unpack quickly to prevent potentially dangerous pet situations, such as open boxes.

 

When done strategically and with proper planning, moving with a pet can be a productive experience. Before the process, consider every option and variable—from the type of housing and your timeline to transportation and unpacking procedures. Then, work to support your pet throughout the journey. A successful move and home introduction is key to a happy and healthy post-move life.

 

 

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